Volume 10 Supplement 2

INEBRIA 12th Congress,

Open Access

Risky drinkers and their physicians

Addiction Science & Clinical Practice201510(Suppl 2):P11

DOI: 10.1186/1940-0640-10-S2-P11

Published: 24 September 2015

Background

The study is focused on prevalence of risky and harmful drinking in Czech adults and on opinions of Czech GPs about the impact of alcohol on health of their patients. Self-assessment of doctors' effectiveness in reduction of patients' alcohol consumption was also addressed.

Material and methods

The results presented are based on the National Survey on Tobacco Smoking and Alcohol Consumption (N = 1,802) [1, 2] and on a survey of 294 Czech GPs carried out within the ODHIN project [3, 4].

Results

Risky or harmful alcohol consumption was found in one in five Czech adults. 34% of respondents reported their doctor asked them about alcohol consumption and 8.6% received advice to reduce or stop drinking. This advice was more common for respondents over 45 years of age. In contrast with this only 22 respondents (1.2%) felt they would need professional help[1, 2]. About one third of the sample of Czech GPs considered None or very low drinking as very important for good health. Greater importance doctors attributed to other risk behaviors. The study identified lack of time, lack of professional training and lack of funding for preventive activities as barriers to broader implementation of alcohol consumption screening and brief intervention (SBI). Only 8.5% of GPs reported they were very effective in influencing drinking habits among their patients. 32% subjectively believe their efficiency in this area would be increased with adequate specialized training[3].

Conclusions

Only eight to nine percent of PHC patients receive recommendation to reduce drinking. GPs feel insecure regarding SBI to reduce alcohol consumption in patients, which could be changed if adequate education is provided. To overcome major barriers of wider implementation of SBI in PHC joint efforts and common interest of GPs, health insurance agencies and the Ministry of Health are needed.

Declarations

Acknowledgements

The research has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 259268 - Optimizing delivery of health care intervention (ODHIN).

Research has been financially supported by a grant from the Czech Ministry of Education no. ODHIN-7E11001 and received institutional support of the Czech Ministry of Health.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Monitoring and research center for tobacco and alcohol, National Institute of Public Health
(2)
National Institute of Mental Health

References

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Copyright

© Sovinova and Csemy 2015

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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