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Table 2 Intervention characteristics and individual characteristics

From: Clinical leaders and providers’ perspectives on delivering medications for the treatment of opioid use disorder in Veteran Affairs’ facilities

  Baseline, % Follow-up, %  
n Strongly disagree/Disagree Neither Agree or Disagree Strongly agree/Agree n Strongly disagree/Disagree Neither Agree or Disagree Strongly agree/Agree p-valued
Intervention Characteristics
 Delivering medications (buprenorphine or naltrexone) to treat OUD in my clinic:
  Is important 54 1.8 0.0 94.7 57 1.6 4.9 86.9 0.16
  Will save livesb 54 0.0 3.6 92.8 57 0.0 4.9 88.5 0.39
  Is time consumingb 52 28.6 26.8 37.5 57 26.2 32.8 34.5 0.66
  Detracts from my clinical responsibilities 53 50.7 19.6 14.3 56 52.5 24.6 14.8 0.87
  Is more dangerous than management of other chronic conditionsb 53 67.8 10.7 16.1 57 68.9 18.0 6.6 0.10
  Is supported by randomized clinical trials or other scientific evidencea 54 1.9 13.0 85.2 57 1.8 8.8 89.5 0.60
  Is consistent with clinical practices that have been accepted by VA patientsa 54 3.7 11.1 85.2 57 3.5 19.3 78.2 0.20
  Can be integrated into my clinic’s procedures and workflowa 54 7.1 14.3 75.0 56 8.2 14.8 68.9 0.64
Individual Characteristics
 Indicate your level of agreement or disagreement with the following statements:
  The risk of patients diverting these medications is too highc 54 64.8 22.2 13.0 58 56.9 32.8 10.3 0.76
  1. Beliefs about Delivering Medication to Treat Opioid Use Disorder (OUD)
  2. OUD opioid use disorder, VA Veteran’s Administration
  3. *p < .05
  4. aItem is from the Organizational Readiness to Change Assessment questionnaire
  5. bItem based on Wakeman and Barnett, 2018.19
  6. cItem adapted from Netherland, Botsko, Egan, et al., 2009.20
  7. dBased on odds of responding Agree/Strongly Agree relative to other responses. Adjusted for gender and prescriber status and clustered on regional network